Introduction to Minerals

16
Aug
2019

Aside from vitamins, minerals are also micronutrients that are important for your body growth and to maintain your healthiness. Your body takes in minerals better through direct food intakes rather than in the form of supplements. Nearly all people do not demonstrate any symptoms of minerals inadequacy. However, this does not indicate your body are adequate of nutrients or minerals intakes. Your body needs different quantities of intake of each mineral as different mineral carry out different role. Physiological status, gender and age will affect the requirement of an individual for minerals intake. Excessive intake of minerals will lead to toxicity in your body. There are two common categories of minerals: macrominerals and trace minerals.

Macrominerals

Macrominerals are minerals that require a high amount of intakes (from 100 mg to one gram) than other minerals. Magnesium, potassium, calcium, chloride, sodium and phosphorus are classified as macrominerals. Macrominerals like calcium are important for maintaining the strength of bone and development of bone.

Trace Minerals

Trace minerals are other minerals that your body needed in lesser amounts. Even though your body needs smaller quantities of trace minerals, trace minerals still play a crucial role in maintaining your body’s health. Copper, fluoride, iodine, selenium and zinc are categorized under trace minerals.

Reference: Nutrition in the News Facts behind the headlines Previous Facts behind the headlines BNF Consultation responses New reports Previous reports Diet, n., Diet, n., Ba, N., Nutrition Science Webinars Nutrients, s., Nutrients, F., Healthy, s. and events, C. (2019). Minerals and trace elements – British Nutrition Foundation – Page #1. [online] Nutrition.org.uk. Available at: https://www.nutrition.org.uk/nutritionscience/nutrients-food-and-ingredients/minerals-and-trace-elements.html?limit=1&start=1 [Accessed 16 Aug. 2019].