Introduction to Protein

03
May
2019

All cells and tissues contain protein. Therefore, proteins are important in the growth and repair of the body. Proteins are large molecules made up of chains of amino acids, which are our body’s building blocks used to make muscle, skin and various molecules that serve many important functions. However, not all amino acid can be made by the body and we need to obtain essential amino acid from our diet.

Consequences of low protein intake

Inadequate intake of protein is associated with increased risk of sarcopenia, an age-related decline in skeletal muscle mass and strength that result in decreased mobility and increased risk of injury. In addition, low intake of protein is associated with low immunity and greater risk of bone fractures.

How much protein do I need?

Based on the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) by Health Promotion Board (HPB), the daily protein requirement of normal healthy individuals in men and women aged 18 and above is 68g and 58g respectively. There is an extra requirement for pregnant and lactating women (first 6 months) – an additional 9g and 25g of protein respectively.

Do you know?

The most abundant compound in the body is water, followed by protein.

Reference: Lonnie, M., Hooker, E., Brunstrom, J., Corfe, B., Green, M., Watson, A., Williams, E., Stevenson, E., Penson, S. and Johnstone, A., 2018. Protein for life: Review of optimal protein intake, sustainable dietary sources and the effect on appetite in ageing adults. Nutrients, 10(3), p.360.